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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 374 (some duplicates have been removed)
the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial contribution each year to be able to put on
traveled to iraq to become suicide bombers. the highest number from any town outside of iraq. >> the city and its surroundings were sympathetic to these groups because they had a common enemy which was kadafi. >> from the onset of the revolution, it was the extremists that provided security. after liberation was announced, there was increasing pressure on kald in yemen and other places. alleged to have been sent here by al qaeda's leader. according to security sources, these militia have a common goal weakening and infiltrating libya's security apparatus. in benghazi there have been more than a dozen assassinations of former military officers. sources tell cnn that many of them were reportedly on a islamist hit list to eliminate qualified individuals that could pose a threat. kernel from the lyan army was recently kidnapped. he doesn't know by whom or exactly why. he got a call from a man who spoke as if he knew him and said he had urgent information to pass on. outside his home, in broad daylight, two masked man forced him into their car. when i got into the car, they put a black hood on
? yes. ok - that's fine. >> i served in iraq recently and and i would be curious as to whether the report gives attention to the work we have done in iraq. there were a number of projects that n.e.d. was involved in in iraq and the republican institute assisting the iraqis preparing for elections. i was working at the provincial reconstruction team level. we have voter education as one project. we instructed iraqi schoolchildren on the concept of human rights and the role of the elections in a democratic society for grades 1-12. we were doing work in this area. iraqis complained that some of our efforts in public health was not being sufficiently publicized to the iraqi public. >> we did not really deal too much with the situation in iraq. we were looking at it from a more global point of view. many of the things you're talking about are the kinds of projects that would come under this strategy now. iraq was a different situation. we were there at large numbers with large forces and could operate in a more direct way than we could generally speaking. >> also, i don't want in a
themselves don't know. they are making this up as they go along. lara and i saw this in iraq when we were recovering that conflict. at the start of the conflict many of those who were fighting in the name of saddal hussein regarded the jihadist with a kind of contempt. gradually they became allies and the next thing you know they are not ridinged tiger, the tiger was riding them and the jihaddists had taken over the fight. then of course there was a long perd. >> then you had the awakening to split them apart. >> so there is an arc to these events. and hopefully if these things are inevitable, hopefully that arc is shortened. and the syrians learn from the iraqi experience and the next revolution overlearns from them. >> where are we with respect to iraq today, not some of we, where is iraq today. >> it's a country still trying to find a way to work different elements of that society are trying to work with each other. there is too much pent up resement among the shiite orce the snnietheris relatively new resentment among the sunnis of the shiites and they are still trying too sort out, t
. they are there. multiple tours serving for this country in iraq and afghanistan. also glen doherty. the former navy seal 42 years old. according to the secretary of state he was an experienced navy seal, paramedic in. a statement his brother said that he joined the seals in 1995 because he had a desire to push himself and to use his talent to make general june change in the world. i have standing by colonel jack jacobs. i'm hoping that we can talk with the colonel about what we are witnessing here. the white house is saying that this is not the so-called dignified transfer of remains. but a ceremony nonetheless. the transfer of remains. you've seen this too many times when it's been soldiers fighting for our country. these are diplomats who were working and serving as the face of our country. around the world. >> this kind of ceremony takes place all the time down in dover, delaware, where the bodies of the fallen come back from southwest asia after fighting in afghanistan and iraq. this is a very big deal for the white house because it breaks to have been control of the natural security high
on iraq and saddam hussein. eichenwald writes -- >> to talk about the significance of these findings, we're joined by the author himself, kurt eichenwald, an award winning journalist and contributing editor at "vanity fair." his of a guest today is called, "the deafness before the storm." his latest book, "500 days: secrets and lies in the terror wars." we welcome you to "democracy now!" lay out the chronology for us but a lot of people know august 6, 2001, right before the september 11 attacks, explain then that memo and how you went back. >> that is the way to look at this, which is backwards. in 2004, the 9/11 commission hearings were saying, we want to see these presidential daily greeks. the bush administration fought releasing them. they finally released the august 61, which now have the infamous headline "bin laden determined to strike u.s.." in her testimony, condoleezza rice, the national security adviser at the time, said this was merely a historical document, a review of bin laden and al qaeda and what they've done. when you read it, that is what it was. it was also a red herr
in america for anything, it's for a bad reason. when they were flowing into iraq to martyr themselves trying to kill american troops in iraq, al qaeda documents seized by the u.s. army in iraq showed the little town of derna in libya sent more volunteers to die in iraq in 2006 and 2007 than any other place in the entire arab world. libya, per capita, as a country, sent more fighters to iraq than any other country, but it was specifically derna, that town, that sent the highest number of fighters. the most. full stop. and in 2008 the man who would become our ambassador, christopher stevens, he went to derna to assess the state of militancy and anti-americanism there. .and his cable back to washington actually used the bruce willis movie "diehard" as an analysis for understanding how intense the local attitudes were there about jihad. once the uprising against moammar gadhafi was under way, cnn reported this june that al qaeda central, the part that used to be headed by bin laden, al qaeda central dispatched a top operator from the tribal areas in pakistan to go to derna, to go to that part of
multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. since 2010, he protected american diplomatic personnel in dangerous posts from central america to the middle east. he had the hands of a healer as well as the arms of a warrior. earning distinction as a registered nurse and certified paramedic. our hearts go out to to his wife and his three sons. along with his grieving family, friends, and colleagues. glen doherty was also a former seal and an experienced paramedic. he died protecting his colleagues. he was employed to some of the most dangerous places on earth, including iraq and afghanistan, always putting his life on to safeguard other americans. our thoughts and prayers are with his father, his mother, his brother, and sister, and their grieving families, friends, and colleagues. i was honored to know ambassador chris stevens. i want to thank his parents and siblings who are here today for sharing chris with us and with their country. what a wonderful gift you gave us. over his distinguished career in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those peop
iosamabin laden is gone. he also said we'd end the war in iraq responsibly. we've done that. he has protected civilians in libya, and qaddafi is gone. i serve up at the united nations, and i see every day the difference in how countries around the world view the united states. they view us as a partner. they view us as somebody they want to work with. they view president obama as somebody they trust. our standing in the world is much stronger so it charge of weakness is really quite baseless. >> schieffer: do you think mitt romney spoke inappropriately when he criticized and issued a statement so early in this turmoil? >> bob, i think you know, in my role, i'm not going to jump into politics and make those judgments. that's for the american people to decide. >> schieffer: madam ambassador thank you for being with us. >> thank you very much. >> schieffer: and joining us now for his take on all this, the ranking republican on the senate armed services committee, john mccain. senator, you've got to help me out here. the president of libya says that this was something that had been in t
taken us out of iraq. president obama who has waged a tough war against al qaeda and has gone off the leadership note tbli osama bin laden who has taken out from the terrorist on yemen -- and president obama because of the actions in the very pressive record has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy. he hasn't supported israel enough. or not as tough as he should be with china. i'm not sure that's getting through. i wonder if romney might be better adviced to articulate in a more detailed way how he would change american and foreign and security policy and how do we deal with china, russia, get out of afghanistan with i have 68,000 men and tbhim uniform in afghanistan. the debate start as you know next week, it looks like foreign policy will be a part part of the debate in the campaign. i think it's healthy we discuss the issues. >> host: i want your comments from out there from the viewers. for nicholas burns who is up in boston. he's teaching a harvard. he spe
president obama, who has taken us out of iraq, president obama who has waged a very tough war against al qaeda, has gone after the al qaeda leadership, notably osama bin laden, who has taken out some of the terrorists in yemen, including awlaki, an important terrorist figured there. president obama, because of his actions and his impressive record, has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy, that he has not supported israel and off, or has been not as tough as he should be on china. i am not sure if that is getting through, and i wonder if governor romney might be better advised in this campaign to articulate in a much more detailed way how he would change american foreign and national security policy on the big issues -- how do we deal with china, russia, how do we get out of afghanistan. we still have 68,000 american men and women in uniform in afghanistan. the debate starts next week, and it looks like foreign policy will be a big part of the debate in the campaign,
," which was somewhat satisfying for someone from my background. no one would argue we were at war in iraq or afghanistan. i wanted evidence he believed we were at war with the groups that had attacked us on 9/11. in august 2009, my wife and i were in phoenix, ariz., for a vfw convention. president obama was the speaker. the president explicitly said, "we are at war with al qaeda and its affiliates." foreign and domestic, law enforcement intelligence. the president was going to use all the authority he had in his backpack like his predecessor. law enforcement authorities when they were useful, but he would not limit himself just to law enforcement authority. he would actually use his authority as commander in chief. after a few weeks in office, president obama was awarded the nobel peace prize. some have said he wanted because he was not president bush and the europeans wanted to confirm that fact. do you recall his acceptance speech in scandinavia? do you recall at the scene at? i watched him carefully. he was here at the protium -- podium and teh camera is here. you can see teh back o --
because of iraq and because of guantanamo. they hated us because of the torture -- he used the word and accuses his own country ever torturing. and he is now apologizing and promising to change course. we would no longer be tough. we would be loved. we would show compassion. and we would get out of iraq. he set a deadline for afghanistan. he doesn't support the green revolution in iran. he shows the ayatollahs tremendous respect. he essentially protects them when they are under attack. he gets nowhere on the iran nuclear issue. he is equivocal in the arab spring. he leads from behind in libya. the theory was if we go soft and we are very nice, if we -- if we say [speaking in arabic [enough times, it will be all right. he decided, the theory and therefore the practice is going to be, retreat and withdraw. remember the line he uses? the tide of war is receding. >> sean: exactly. >> that means the tide of american power is receding. and the reason that american interests, schools, embassies, businesses are aflame in the middle-east from tunis to south asia is because things don't happe
of iraq for us. turns out largely what patriquin wanted it to because he proved to be very effective in fighting al qaeda and try to begin to flip from pro-al qaeda to the coalition side. in my book there are few scenes of patriquin in action. one of them was patriquin first met him. he shows up with a mustache and he speaks arabic slang, iraqi arabic and his first meeting face-to-face at what part of iraq are you from, the north or the south? patriquin as he often did would say something like no i'm from chicago. i am an american and many iraqis were befuddled by that because he thought he might've been an iraqi left as a child and done over and came back with a funny western accident. they met and quickly became very close allies through this struggle. >> you can watch this and other programs on line of booktv.org. >> you dinesh d'sousa presents his thoughts on what a second term for the obama administration would look like. the author contends that the president's policies would greatly reduce america's global force. it's about one hour, 10. [applause] >> thank you. please sit dow
think about the war in iraq. where did most of the anti-u.s. soldiers and militants come from? they came from benghazi. it is not like we didn't know there is it a problem >> look. every country in the region has a radical islamic movement that is operating inside of it. and they move fighters around you they make no mistake about it and final question. have we gained anything by our involvement in the middle east? should we change our strategy. and like any president wouldn't. given what is happening to us. and our policy now is unstate we saw it unfold over the last three plus years we are disengaging from the middle east. our friends say why aren't you standing here with us. look at iran. permitting them to have a nuclear weapon and we have a feckless policy that is not standing up to them and we are pulling out of iraq despite the recommendation and turn it over to iranian influence and time table in afghanistan as well >> thank you so much. and are we angry enough over the violence in the middle east? ambassador bolton next and finding justice for four americans killed in [ male ann
, then we go to iraq, saddam hussein, he was a good boy at one point. we have to learn to shoot straight when it comes to foreign policy. host: i have to get some other voices in here. bob? go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. i had a personal remembrances about 9/11. i woke up at 11:00. my mother, who had died of alzheimer's, said i needed to see this thing on television. i was speaking with a friend of mine over at the spartan route. i said -- you know, these guys are muslim fundamentalists and fanatics. they might have their real names on the manifest. go look at that. follow the money. they went back and confirmed what the fbi report said from earlier that year, which had been kind of pushed under. we got lucky in that times square bombing. we solved that one. thank god the bomb did not off. but you know, we have had 10,000 people die in that war. thank god we got osama bin laden and it was a police action. thank you so much. host: how should we mark the day? last night on facebook we ask all of you to comment on how america has changed in the 11 years. host: you can put y
, syria, pakistan, iraq -- i met him in person finally before he was going to pakistan. we spent half a day with him. everything that happened, everything composite to his description -- ryan finished in the last years of the bush administration, presided over a transition that was complex and difficult and retired with the highest title of career ambassador. he came back to texas and worked as the dean of a school. at that point, he was looking at a life that would be his own. fortunately, for the united states, the president called again. in very difficult moments, president obama asked him to come back to national service. being the patriot that he is, he did. he left the school and went back to afghanistan as america's ambassador in a moment when we were beginning yet another transition period this afternoon, we have been very blessed to have him come to carnegie to make this stop but his return from afghanistan. he will speak to us about what the transition in that country holds, what the prospects are at why afghanistan still matters to the united states. ladies and gentlemen, p
was coined be far different book than this. and then after my military experiences and iraq and afghanistan, and as you started seeing the iranian issued a different light i expanded the scope of the book and spent a good ten years researching and writing this. my wife likes to remind me we haven't had a vacation since 2004. so very much every waking moment of my free time. i took a sabbatical from the government service. i was in the washington think tank for an extended period of time which gave me the freedom away from the government to write and travel. the research is quite interesting. if you're familiar with government records and the modern era, they are not in very good shape. most of them are electronic records. a lot of them have not been saved. so it really is -- we are not finding people who still have records talking to people. obviously archives -- and caspar weinberger giving me access to his papers. one of the best sources was a retired admiral i stumbled into who have really detailed presidential and secretary defense level meeting notes in notebooks he had in the crawl sp
stronger. >> steve: sure, as we look at protest all over the region today, it sounds as if in iraq apparently one of the toughest militias thetening action against the american interest there. >> brian: can you believe it. >> steve: the film initial he started it. do you think that will unleash wave of anti-americanism that is brewing. >> the film is not the recourse. it is an excuse . it is a stupid film and i don't know who is behind it. it is much deeper. you look at the radical forces. change the headlines. if you want a arab spring it is an arab winter. spring is something you expect good to come out. but you will not see's democracy. >> steve: danny, how big is al-qaida in this? we heard before 9/11 the number one guy put out the radio and said we have to avenge the death of the u.s. drone. we discover his brother was in a protest in cairo and one of the rebel rousers and taking credit for organizing it. >> i am sure it is linked together. the connection between iran and hes hesbollah. it is parts of the muslim religion from the qu'ran and say they take it another step agains
it is in their interest to have a good relationship with iraq. they should not limited because -- [inaudible] or the muslim brotherhood. this is a great mistake. the other thing that is taking place, which again feeds in to the sense of frugs frustration and marginalization that many of the young men exhibit is you don't have the leadership in the other world. you have to look at the becames of states in the middle east, what do you see? you see today it marginalize it began -- [inaudible] okay. and egypt a country of 7,000 years 75 million people was the [inaudible] inned medieval times. egypt today has a great power could not influence events in gaza. they cannot control it. that is really numbing on the egyptian. it [inaudible] egypt today cannot compete with turkey, it cannot compete with iran, egypt today because egypt believes it is leave in the shadow of the powerful israeli states. [inaudible] so there is a leadership in the arab world. states like egypt, syria, iraq, have been marginalized for hundreds of years. the decision making process is very slow in libya. they have a leader
as a s.e.a.l. with multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. after retiring, he worked as a nurse in his wife's dental practice. sean smith was a computer expert, an air force veteran and was with support and service for ten years. he was married with two children. also killed was former navy s.e.a.l. glen doherty from massachusetts. a private security contractor, he was in libya searching for a shoulder launch antiaircraft missiles, a high u.s. government priority after the fall of moammar gadhafi. >> so deeply saddening, it also makes us aware, though, of the kind of role that people like chris and over the years are playing, unsung, but the critical role that they play. >> glen lived his life to the fullest. he was my brother, but if you asked his friends, he was their brother as well. >> i'm sure my son went down fighting. i don't know the ins and outs of it. i haven't been told. but i'm sure he went down fighting. i'm sure he did. i just hope his last moments weren't painful. >> they are now coming home. the transfer of remains, ceremony, scheduled to begin in a few minutes. that at
affiliation, i would be grateful. why don't we start here in front? yes. ok - that's fine. >> i served in iraq recently and i would be curious as to whether the report gives attention to the work we have done in iraq. there were a number of projects that n.e.d. was involved in in iraq and the republican institute assisting the iraqis preparing for elections. i was working at the provincial reconstruction team level. we have voter education as one project. we instructed iraqi schoolchildren on the concept of human rights and the role of the elections in a democratic society for grades 1-12. we were doing work in this area. iraqis complained that some of our efforts in public health was not being sufficiently publicized to the iraqi public. >> we did not really deal too much with the situation in iraq. we were looking at it from a more global point of view. many of the things you're talking about are the kinds of projects that would come under this strategy now. iraq was a different situation. we were there at large numbers with large forces and could operate in a more direct way than we could
. tyrone woods, is known to most as rone, spent two decades as a navy seal, serving multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. since 2010, he protected american diplomatic personnel in dangerous posts from central america to the middle east. he had the hands of a healer as well as the arms of a warrior. earning distinction as a registered nurse and certified paramedic. our hearts go out to to his wife and his three sons. along with his grieving family, friends, and colleagues. glen doherty was also a former seal and an experienced paramedic. he died protecting his colleagues. he was employed to some of the most dangerous places on earth, including iraq and afghanistan, always putting his life on to safeguard other americans. our thoughts and prayers are with his father, his mother, his brother, and sister, and their grieving families, friends, and colleagues. i was honored to know ambassador chris stevens. i want to thank his parents and siblings who are here today for sharing chris with us and with their country. what a wonderful gift you gave us. over his distinguished career in the foreign
of democracy in that god-forsaken region? iraq! george bush's iraq. that's how you install a democracy in the middle-east, with the help of the united states military. it is not with a bunch of men running around, gang raping american journalists and shooting guns in the air. the idea that this was going to lead to anything good was preposterous. >> a big impact on the campaign -- last question. >> i -- i-- >>> booing god and booing jerusalem -- >> i think it ought to. but i think the economy is going to remain the predominant issue. but i don't know. this could get worse and worse. the more you back down to savage, the more they are going to attack. >> sean: we are living through at this time rise of radical islamists. >> you know what we are -- we are living off the good effect of the war in iraq. the good effect of the bush years. but you can only live off that so long. >> sean: i think this president is a wimp. i think this president doesn't have the courage to stand up to these terrorists. either that or he can't identify it for what it is -- >> he is utterly naive, you can say th
diplomacy is to emphasize respect for islam in the wake of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. in may of 2008, president bush went beyond just offering support. after an american soldier used a koran for target practice, president bush actually apologized to iraqi prime minister nouri al maliki. >> he apologized for that in the sense the that he said, we take it very seriously, we were concerned about their reaction, we wanted them to know that the president knew that this was wrong and that the commanders in the field had publicly reprimanded the soldier and removed him from iraq. >> this was always one of the most admirable dimensions of the bush administration. and a real achievement. after 9/11, it was entirely possible that the country could have lapsed into anti-muslim sentiment. the bush administration legitimately fought to keep that from happening, and they largely succeeded. let's turn to congressman keith ellison, who was also the first muslim member of congress. congressman, good to have you here tonight. >> thank you. thanks for having me. >> the bush administration understood th
he was talking about iraq but in fact he meant it and we sometimes, we didn't really listen to bush reducing his statements to the perception we had of him, forgetting that he is representing a system. he is representing an administration. this administration was pushing and is still pushing for many reasons not only political, anything which has to -- today to do with organization in the region and the bloggers who were pushing and spreading around this feeling that something should change in egypt and tunisia and even in syria or in yemen, many of them -- google, freedom house were training people and financing the training of people who are advocating democracy and liberating the country and they were trained by american organizations, european organizations and if we were to study what happened in eastern europe where is the whole process of what is called the european spring, the eastern european spring, you can see that there was behind it a philosophy. no one had heard, enough people have heard about popovich who was getting the sense of of how do we mobilize the people in or
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 374 (some duplicates have been removed)